Best Halo Game: We Ranked Halo From Worst to First

Best Halo Games Ranked
(343 Industries / Bungie /Ensemble Studios)

I don’t mean to alarm you but the Halo franchise has been around for nearly TWO DECADES and, despite Master Chief’s line about ‘finishing the fight’ a few games back, our green armored hero doesn’t appear to be calming his trigger finger anytime soon. Halo Infinite is still set to release later this year so we thought it would be fun to revisit the action-packed series that has defined so many of our gaming experiences.

Also, to make things more interesting (and not at all controversial), we’ve ranked every major Halo title from worst to best. Yes, every entry has added a little more to the already massive Halo universe, but they aren’t all perfectly cut gems in the pantheon of gaming – some are definitely a little rougher around the edges. Did your favorite come out on top or did it take too many unsuccessful risks to truly stand out above the rest?

Halo Games in Order

11) Halo Spartan Strike

(343 Industries)

The second of two top-down twin-stick Halo shooters available on mobile platforms, Spartan Strike tosses players into the boots of an unnamed Spartan shooting it out during the attack on New Mombassa at the end of Halo 4. It ramps up the action to make up for its smaller scale by equipping players with oodles of weapons and gear right out of the gate, resulting in a one-Spartan-army the likes of which could give the Master Chief a run for his money.

It feels a lot like what Halo might have been if it was released as an arcade game back in the ’80s. The bite-sized missions are ideal for mobile platforms but it’s disappointing that it can’t be played on Xbox platforms or with friends in a co-op mode like its predecessor. Plus, with so many previously visited locales from past games, it’ll probably leave you wondering why you aren’t playing one of those titles instead.

10) Halo Spartan Assault

(343 Industries)

Another twin-stick shooter, Spartan Assault follows the battles of Spartans Edward Davis and Sarah Palmer as it attempts to bridge the gap between Halo 3 and Halo 4. Its beautifully animated cutscenes, well-produced sounds effects, and superior voice acting are definitely impressive and the option to play on the Xbox 360 or Xbox One is convenient, but the twin-stick controls remain a bit frustrating and take time to get used to. Players with a mouse and keyboard on hand can avoid a lot of headaches.

Additionally, the arcade-based scoring system, while a good idea in theory, seems to detract from the character-focused narrative that the game clearly tried to push. It’s hard to feel an emotional pull from the characters when kill streak indicators are constantly splashing across the screen. Overall, Assault is a nice fix if you’re feeling the itch to dive back into the Halo universe while on-the-go, but don’t expect to feel fully satisfied.

9) Halo Wars

(Ensemble Studios)

A Halo game without the Master Chief is odd, but when it’s not even a first-person shooter, you can’t help but wonder what Microsoft was thinking (or drinking). Halo Wars wasn’t necessarily a bad game, though. The console-based real-time strategy game features a solid story, gorgeous cutscenes, and a score by Stephen Rippy that rivals Martin O’Donnell’s incredible work from previous games. It was even developed by Ensemble Studios—the same developer behind the classic Age of Empires games—but none of this could save it from feeling a bit clunky and out-of-place when compared to the polished shooters Bungie was known for.

On the bright side, the process of building massive bases, armies, and vehicles is definitely streamlined compared to other RTS titles, making your fight against the Covenant brisk and constant rather than being bogged down by menus and other minutiae commonplace in the genre. The birds-eye view of combat simply can’t compare to adrenaline-pumping action you get while staring down the barrels of various UNSC-issued weaponry, though. Even though Halo Wars rightfully earned an ardent group of fans who appreciated its deviation from the norm, most franchise vets and seasoned RTS players couldn’t be bothered with it.

8) Halo Wars 2

(343 Industries / Creative Assembly)

Another real-time strategy Halo game? Sure. We were all craving more mediocrity. Halo Wars 2—developed by Creative Assembly after Ensemble Studios disbanded—provided additional polish and a handful of new features but, for the most part, was more of the same. At least the single-player experience offered some bold new steps narratively as players face off against a fearsome new foe, but it’s a short campaign that ends rather abruptly and on a frustrating cliffhanger.

Multiplayer offers much of the same experiences, too, but on mostly smaller maps this go-around for some reason. Thankfully, the game’s exciting new Blitz mode is a fun feature that further streamlines resource-gathering and base-building by giving players a set of cards enabling them to deploy troops and special abilities anywhere on the map. The system makes games more fast-paced and intense, distancing itself even further from the classic RTS experience but offering something new that casual and new RTS players might appreciate.

7) Halo 4

(343 Industries)

After Bungie departed Xbox Game Studios, 343 Industries was left with the daunting task of following in their massive, Master Chief-sized footsteps, so it’s no surprise that their first foray into the Halo universe wasn’t everyone’s cup of tea. Halo 4 isn’t necessarily a bad game; it’s a perfectly adequate shooter that’s plenty of fun to play and looks damn good despite the Xbox 360’s aging hardware. It simply didn’t live up to the Halo standards that folks knew, loved, and expected.

It features a more “human” side to John-117, delving deeper into his background and relationships than ever before but the gameplay and overall story weren’t as innovative or interesting to match. It lacked the scope and depth of titles in the previous Halo trilogy and its multiplayer seemingly took more notes from Call of Duty than any Halo installment. Overall, it’s a solid game that delivers a quality gaming experience but remains pretty lackluster when compared to the rest of the franchise.

6) Halo 5

(343 Industries)

We all had high hopes for the Xbox One’s first proper Halo game (it currently holds the record for the biggest Halo launch, after all) but it ended up feeling like the most confused entry in the series. The campaign was designed with an entire squad of online friends in mind and, as a result, is a pretty brutal grind when stuck playing with a bunch of AI Spartans. One round against the damnable Warden Eternal (a recurring mini-boss who only takes damage when you can maneuver around him and shoot him in the back) will make you understand.

To make matters worse, 343 decided to put the kibosh on one of the biggest draws to the Halo experience: couch co-op. So, even if you want to play with someone else, they’ll need their own copy of the game, Xbox One console, TV, and Xbox Live subscription to join you in the fight.

Now, despite what some pissy fanboys might say, the latest Halo entry isn’t all bad. Multiplayer introduced plenty of fun, redeeming qualities to the franchise like streamlined player movement and the sprawling action of the Warzone game mode, but it still felt a bit dated compared to other FPS titles at the time. Not to mention, you’d have to look far and wide to find a player who likes a loot box system. Here’s to hoping for a return to the series’ roots in Halo Infinite.

5) Halo 3: ODST

(Bungie)

Despite not even letting players jump into the Mjolnir armor of a Spartan, the jazzy Halo 3: ODST solidified itself as a hit with its unique noir themes, engaging storyline, and colorful cast of characters. It was the brave departure from the norm that made this massive “expansion” stand out amongst a catalog of full-length titles. Rather than playing a superpowered Spartan, ODST throws you into the boots of a UNSC shock trooper – no dual-wielding, no armor upgrades, no problem. It stripped away many of the science fiction elements of other Halo games in favor of a pretty straightforward military campaign chock-full of easter eggs for those willing to search for them.

But fear not – there’s still plenty of alien-slaughtering goodness here. In fact, ODST was our first introduction to Firefight: the single or cooperative horde mode that had players fighting wave after wave of Covenant attackers. And while ODST simply adopted Halo 3’s superb multiplayer mode, it included all of the main game’s DLC maps, making it the ideal expansion for an already incredible game.

Oh, and extra points for Nathan Fillion.

4) Halo: Combat Evolved (the best one to start with if you’re a newcomer)

(Bungie)

The FPS that defined a generation, Halo CE was a rare gem that placed as much importance on universe-building as it did game mechanics, which instantly made Microsoft’s new video game console a household name. Players were thrust headfirst into a high-octane emergency escape to a mysterious ring-world that neither you nor the characters in the game knew anything about. We were introduced to the fearsome Covenant, the zombie-like Flood, and a pistol that could probably sink an aircraft carrier, all of which made the game truly unforgettable.

Of course, it was the game’s multiplayer that gave Halo CE its longevity. It introduced countless console gamers to LAN parties for the first time, offering up matches with a then-astounding 16 players, all of whom were likely screaming obscenities across a Doritos- and Mountain Dew-filled house. Add to that the introduction of near-perfect multiplayer maps like Battle Creek, Hang Em’ High, and Blood Gulch and you’ve got yourself an instant classic that lived up to its name by evolving first-person combat as we knew it.

3) Halo: Reach

(Bungie)

Reach was Bungie’s last hurrah in the Halo realm and, boy, oh boy, did they want to leave an impression. Despite being nearly 10 years old, the game still holds up thanks to its impressive art direction and fluid gameplay. The perfectly-paced campaign stands out for being a prologue that ends in heroic tragedy rather than the standard Mjolnir-armored fist pump of victory and features a squad made up predominantly of Spartan-III’s rather than beefy Spartan-II’s like the Master Chief.

It’s a game that took major risks, many of which paid off. Spartan suit customization is taken to a whole new level and armor abilities add depth and positively affect the flow of multiplayer combat (though, armor lock users can still go straight to hell). The updated Forge mode offered players countless hours of custom map-building and the dedicated Griffball playlist is more fun than it has any right to be. Sure, players can knit-pick certain aspects like the hollow, short-lived characters and the introduction of reticle bloom but, all in all, Reach is the proper send-off from Bungie we deserved.

2) Halo 2

(Bungie)

The sequel to Halo CE that seemingly every gamer on the planet was clamoring for, Halo 2 was not only a worthy follow-up to a genre-defining FPS but truly defined the landscape of online gaming.  It was visually stunning at the time and introduced key gameplay features like dual-wielding weapons and vehicle hijacking that would become mainstays in the franchise, but the game’s linear campaign also forced us into the role of the Arbiter—a deviation that, while bold in concept, many players weren’t too excited about.

Multiplayer was Halo 2’s crowning achievement, though. Players could finally utilize the mighty power of the internet to slaughter their buddies online, and we did… for hours… sometimes avoiding less important responsibilities like school and daily hygiene to do so. How were we supposed to focus on geometry homework when we knew our friends were online, gutting each other with energy swords on Lockout?

1) Halo 3 (coincidentally, also the  best-selling Halo game)

(Bungie)

The conclusion of the original trilogy, Halo 3 took us back to Earth to “finish the fight” once and for all against the Covenant and the Flood. It not only offered classic Halo combat and gunplay polished to near perfection but also introduced 4-person co-op, which was perfect for taking on its tough-as-nails Legendary difficulty. If it didn’t include the infuriating, flood-infested “Cortana” level (which is a special kind of masochism on higher difficulties), the campaign would be damn-near perfect.

Halo 3’s multiplayer, however, needs no such caveats. This shining jewel of FPS carnage easily competes against Mario Kart and Goldeneye 007 for the best multiplayer experience of all time. Bungie’s top-notch map creators deserve all the credit for constructing some of the most engaging and memorable multiplayer experiences gamers have ever had. On top of this, developers went above and beyond to balance dual-wielding and power weapons and added diverse new items like the bubble shield and power drain, adding depth to an already premium competitive mode. Unsurprisingly, it remains the best-selling Halo title with a staggering 14.5 million copies sold, so if you want to experience Halo as it was meant to be played, look no further.

You might consider breaking up your Halo battles with some work out video games – it’s a legit way to keep your physical fitness in check in the comfort of your own home. The good news is that playing video games with your kids can be good for their health.

The Guys From Toto Perform Quarantine “Africa” From Their Homes

Toto Performs Quarantine Africa
(YouTube/Joseph Williams)

If there’s one song from the 80s that withstood the test of time, it’s “Africa” by Toto. Every so often, it reenters the public consciousness, be it by way of Scrubs episode, Weezer cover, or even buzzing Tesla coils. It’s a near-perfect song, and it’s never going anywhere.

In the spirit of this recent slew of virtual pop culture reunions, some of the guys from Toto got together to dust off their 1982 hit.

Returning for lead vocals you is Joseph Williams.

(YouTube/Joseph Williams)

On percussion, we’ve got Mr. DOO-DOO D-DOO D-DOO D-DOO DOO PSHHH himself, Lenny Castro.

(YouTube/Joseph Williams)

And on vertical phone orientation, we’ve got guitarist Steve Lukather.

(YouTube/Joseph Williams)

You know the words. You know the legendary drum fills. Now get ready to hear “Africa” as you’ve never heard it before: through the lens of a quarantine. Enjoy!

“I really hope you guys out there are safe and well,” says Steve on guitar. “God bless. Hang in there.”

Father Figures: Big Bad Dad

“I am the proud father of an 8-year-old daughter named Winnie.

For years, I was lost on a path toward self-destruction. I was involved in violence, drugs, and alcohol, and seemed destined to end up either dead or in jail.

I managed to forge a career and get married, but always had a monkey on my back. My behavior began to hurt everyone in my life as much as it was hurting me.

Then my daughter was born. The first day I held her, everything in my life changed.

For the first time, I had a direction. There was never an option to fail. My overwhelming love for her made me look myself in a mirror and resolve to become a better person for myself and for her. It took hard work, humility, and honesty for me to get to where I started to feel love for myself and face the demons that were in my closet.

Because of my daughter and the strength she gave me, I built an amazing life for us and have such an amazing relationship with her everyday. We even wrote and published a book together: Big Bad Dad.

These days, I am part of a nonprofit group dedicated to teaching men to show humility and emotion, and encouraging them to speak about their feelings and ask for help.

My daughter completely shifted the way I think about life and the way I live as a man and I am so grateful to her every single day.”

– Ryan Bourquin

Want to share a story about fatherhood? Email [email protected]

Check out the previous editions of Father Figures here.

“My Dad, My Hero” Campaign Helps Kids Honor Their Military Dads

“My Dad, My Hero” Campaign Helps Kids Honor Their Military Dads
(YouTube/Lincoln Military Housing)

Being an amazing dad already means that you’re a hero to your kids. When you’re a military dad though, you’re doing hero double-duty and deserve to be recognized as such. Lincoln Military Housing, a partnership between Lincoln Property Company and the Department of Defense, has helped over 36,000 military families find housing across the country. They know firsthand how much military families sacrifice, and they realize just how heroic these military parents are to their country as well as their kids.

Being the child of a military parent (or two) can be challenging, with fairly frequent moves as well as long periods of time where they may not be able to see their parent in person. Lincoln Military Housing decided that kids needed a way to honor their military dads, and they launched the “My Dad, My Hero” campaign to capture the love and admiration these kids have for their dads.

“It is important as a community that we highlight and celebrate our military children and their fathers. Whether their father is deployed or supporting a spouse in the military, they all provide a great service to our country. Our goal was to honor them through a story told by their very own children,” Ashley Gorski Poole, VP of Marketing and Communications for Lincoln Military Housing, explained on PRWeb.

The touching video features pictures of military dads with their children, handwritten notes, and heartfelt tributes to their beloved dads shared by the kids themselves. The campaign collected over 90 videos, letters, and pictures from military families seeking a way to properly honor their heroic dads. To help kids feel like they’re part of a community of kids just like them, and as a way to thank kids for their submissions, Lincoln Military Housing is sending each kid who contributed to the “My Dad, My Hero” campaign a special challenge coin.

Challenge coins are an important tradition in the military. Challenge coins are given to show membership in a certain group or to recognize a special achievement. Not only did these kids get to honor their dads in a beautiful way, but they also got to take part in a tradition that is undoubtedly meaningful to their dads as well.

Thank you military dads (and all other members of the military, of course), you’re our heroes too.

The 10 Best Comments of the Month: June 2020

Best Comments of the Month

Every month we pan for comedy gold in the comments section of our Facebook posts. If your comment cracks us up (or warms our hearts) we’ll showcase it here!

Here’s last month’s roundup of the 10 Best Comments:

1. Doesn’t Mince Words

2. Cursed!

3. Plot Thickens

4. Alright

5. Driving Miss Daisy

6. GOAT

7. DJ Wingman

8. Be the Dad

9. Mind the Gap

10. Dad Level 100

Check out the previous edition of the best comments of the month here.

Sega Is Releasing a Mini Console Loaded With 32 Classic Games

Sega Mini Console
(Sega/Hardcore Gaming 101)

Sega is slowly becoming a titan in the gaming world of portable emulators. Last year, the Japanese video game developer announced the Genesis Mini, a plug-and-play consoled packed with 40 classic games, from Altered Beasts to Ecco The Dolphin.

(Target)

More recently, they revealed the Game Gear Micro, which is exactly what it sounds like.

(Sega)

Well now, in what could very well be the shrunken console industry’s first hat trick, Sega has unveiled the Astro City Mini. This mini replica is shaped to look just like Sega’s 1993 Astro City arcade cabinet, which is super iconic in Japan and sought after to this day by collectors.

You can check out the official Japanese promo video here:

The portable console will come pre-loaded with 36 classic games, of which the following have been confirmed:

  • Alien Syndrome
  • Alien Storm
  • Golden Axe
  • Golden Axe: The Revenge of Death Adder
  • Columns II
  • Dark Edge
  • Puzzle & Action: Tant-R
  • Virtua Fighter
  • Fantasy Zone
  • Altered Beast

If you’re not hip to Altered Beasts, educate yourself.

Also, exciting fact: this is the very first time Golden Axe: The Revenge of Death Adder

and Dark Edge…

(Sega)

will be available to play on a home system. Until now, they’ve only existed in arcade form. Pretty cool!

There will also be handheld controllers, sold separately, which will come in handy once you HDMI this bad boy to the TV and bash some side-scroller aliens on the big screen.

(Sega)

The Sega Astro City Mini will soon be available in Japan for ¥12,800 (approximately $114), but no word on an international launch just yet. This looks dope though, so fingers crossed!

“Just Resting My Eyes,” Says Dad Waking up From 8-Year Coma

"Just Resting My Eyes"
(Getty/ER Productions Limited)

In a development that’s baffling medical professionals worldwide, 56-year-old dad Gary Hudson awoke from an eight-year coma this week, only to matter-of-factly assure his family he’d simply been resting his eyes.

“Just lettin’ the lids get take a load off,” Gary said, having just spent the better part of a decade with no observable cognition or awareness of external stimuli. “Can’t be just dozing off mid-Monday now can we.”

Gary, whose cerebrum had recently forgone communication with his brain stem for almost 3,000 consecutive days, guaranteed his loved ones he’d merely shuttered the blinds for a “short rest.”

Sources claim Gary emerged from his comatose state after an orderly changed the hospital room TV channel, which he was watching.

Despite being completely plausible to parents, THIS JUST IN is satire and intended for entertainment purposes only. For more stories like this one click here.

Dad Grades: Walter White From Breaking Bad

(Sony Pictures)

It’s been 7 years now since Breaking Bad drew to a close, and we heard Heisenberg utter those unforgettable final words: “Goodbye, Lydia.” No really, that was the last thing anyone on the show said, if you don’t count Jesse’s getaway scream. Seriously. Go check. We don’t talk about this enough. Insane.

Nevertheless, Breaking Bad was a pretty incredible show. Prestige TV at its prestigest. For 5-but-actually-6 seasons, we witnessed the trajectory of Walter White, a terminally ill chemistry professor turned maniacal drug kingpin. Through first-rate performances, masterful storytelling, and cinematography like this

(Sony Pictures Television)

fans were enthralled by Walt’s slow transformation into Heisenberg. But was he a good dad? No. What. Are you insane? Of course not. But we’re gonna give him a Dad Grades anyway.

Warning: SPOILERS AHEAD

STRENGTHS

The premise of this show is rooted in Walt’s responsibilities as a husband and father. After being diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer, Walt decides he needs to make a shitload of money, and fast, to provide financial security for his family. This sounds noble, and something a good dad might even do! More later on how he chooses to acquire this money.

(Sony Pictures Television)

On the surface, Walt’s a great dad. A provider, a teacher, a protector. In season one, we see Walt start to break bad when his son, Walt Jr, who had cerebral palsy, is mocked while trying on jeans. Not on Walt’s watch.

With a second child on the way, Walt continually asserts that every decision he makes, he makes for his family. Occasionally, he’ll try to prove it, like in the season 5 episode “Fifty-One”, in which he concludes a driving lesson with Walt Jr. by purchasing him a brand new Dodge Challenger.

Best of all, he never once tries to rope his into the meth business. Nepotism runs rampant in this society, so it’s refreshing to see Jr. merely running a register and wishing folks an “A1 day” at the car wash. It is a money-laundering scheme, but whatever. He’s good at it.

(Sony Pictures Television)

Again, it’s clear that at first Walt operated with the most selfless of intentions, driven to leave his family peace of mind in the face of mounting medical bills. If you don’t think about it too much, Walt’s a good father.

WEAKNESSES

“I did it for me. I liked it. I was good at it. And I was really — I was alive.”

That’s Walt, to Skyler, in the series finale. Regardless of what we thought of Walt in season one, it’s suggested his motives, in the beginning, were ulterior.

Remember The Bucket List, that movie where Morgan Freeman and Jack Nicholson live their lives to the fullest when confronted with terminal lung cancer? This is sorta like that, except instead of visiting the Taj Mahal and skydiving it’s becoming a treacherous drug lord.

Walt is a truly morally reprehensible guy. He wins us over through sympathy in the first season. We were sorta with when he choked out Krazy-8 and dissolved his body in a barrel of acid. We were sorta with him when he brought down Tuco. But dude…

He watched and did nothing as Jane, the love of Jesse’s life, choked to death in her sleep.

(Sony Pictures Television)

He convinced Jesse to murder the mild-mannered, relatively harmless Gale.

(Sony Pictures Television)

And need we remind you, in a later season, he straight-up poisons a child.

Walt was ostensibly the closest thing Jesse had to a father figure, and he was controlling, selfish, and manipulative the entire time. As Walt descended into unmitigated corruption, he never hesitated to throw Jesse under the bus. Once, while Jesse was literally under a car.

After Uncle Jack executes Hank in the desert, in what’s widely regarded as the series’ best scene, Walt spots Jesse hiding under a car and turns him over to Jack’s Aryan Nation buddies. But not before saying what’s quite possibly the shittiest thing anyone has ever said to another human:


Just a really bad man, man. Redemption was never an option.

Oh, and do we even need to bring up what a dick he was to his wife? People write Skyler White off as a nagging shrew for not being a sufficiently enthusiastic cheerleader while her megalomaniacal meth kingpin husband gives ricin to a six-year-old. Skyler wasn’t the bad guy, you were for thinking that.

Also, we’re gonna have to deduct points here for his poor execution of the classic dad move, Bringing Home A Pizza For Dinner.

VERDICT

Walter White is a despicable person. He lies habitually. He routinely puts his family in harm’s way. He’s the sole reason little Holly will never know her Uncle Hank. Also, did we mention the Jane dying thing? That. Walter White is Heisenberg, and Heisenberg is a monster, and no birthday bacon is gonna change that.

FINAL GRADE: F

Check out our previous edition where we graded John McClane from Die Hard.

Dad Builds DIY Cardboard Tetris Game For His Daughter

Dad Builds DIY Cardboard Tetris Game For His Daughter
(YouTube/Scooby Dooby Tube)

What’s your favorite way to play video games? Are you a PC gamer, or do you use a console like Xbox? If you’re anything like this dad from China’s Henan province, your favorite way to play classic games uses a different kind of box – cardboard, specifically. A video posted on Twitter in early July shows a dad playing a very unconventional game of Tetris, one where zero screens are involved. The board and game pieces are made entirely of cardboard, and the whole thing is hand-made by this talented dad. In the video, we see this smiling dad drop a game piece into a slot behind the game board. The piece then appears in a small opening at the bottom of the board, at which point the surprisingly focused little girl retrieves it and fits it in among the pieces she’s already placed.

This real-life Tetris game is slightly different from the original version, you know, aside from the fact that it’s 3D and extremely energy efficient. The lines on the board don’t disappear once completed, but instead, the goal of the game is to fill up the entire board without any spaces. As if this amazingly simple yet fascinating Tetris game isn’t enough, this creative dad has also built tons of other games for his daughter to play. He built a maze game, a marble obstacle course, a toy bank, and countless others.

In a YouTube video from the South China Morning Post that showcases many of this innovative DIY dad’s inventions, he explains that he did it in part so that kids would be less reliant on technology. The games are inexpensive to make but extremely time-consuming. Some of the more complex pieces can take half a month to complete. He explains that his crafty games have helped his daughter with concentration, and she has even started coming up with her own ideas for games the adorable pair could create.

“My goal is to turn this into a career, to improve it,” the gaming dad said in his Youtube video. “More parents, those who love DIY, or those who don’t have time to be with their kids can be influenced by the toys in some ways, to spend more time with their children.”

See more of this crafty dad’s inventions in the video below, and think about what potential games you may have laying around the house, just waiting to be built.

Batman Universe Expands Again, With New HBO Max Gotham City Police Series

Gotham Police car
(Getty/ullstein bild)

Wonder Woman 1984 is on the way, and after Aquaman’s success, there will definitely be a sequel to that too. But based on last year’s Joker and now all the news coming around about the many different Batman projects – including both Michael Keaton and Ben Affleck’s potential return as different versions of the Dark Knight, it seems almost like DC is pivoting away from any attempt to mimic Marvel’s extended cinematic universe and putting all their money on the caped crusader.

The latest project is no different.

Matt Reeves is currently helming the next Batman adventure to hit the big screen, titled The Batman and starring Robert Pattinson, but it was gonna be a while even before the pandemic delayed production. But HBO Max, fresh off announcing Zack Snyder’s Justice League, is staying in the Batman business with a new TV show from Reeves, and based in The Batman’s universe.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, Reeves is developing a police drama centered around the Gotham City that will appear in The Batman. Terrence Winter, who wrote on The Sopranos and brought Steve Buscemi’s Boardwalk Empire to HBO, will write and produce the new series. So at the very least, the pedigree is strong, and it will be exciting to see superheroes get the prestige TV treatment, especially after the success of Damon Lindelof’s (decidedly different) Watchmen.

“This is an amazing opportunity, not only to expand the vision of the world I am creating in the film but to explore it in the kind of depth and detail that only a long-form format can afford,” said Reeves in a statement. “And getting to work with the incredibly talented Terence Winter, who has written so insightfully and powerfully about worlds of crime and corruption, is an absolute dream.”

The show will be “set in the world Reeves is creating for The Batman feature film and will build upon the motion picture’s examination of the anatomy of corruption in Gotham City, ultimately launching a new Batman universe across multiple platforms. The series provides an unprecedented opportunity to extend the world established in the movie and further explore the myriad of compelling and complex characters of Gotham.”

This has already been done, on Fox, but that was a standalone show centered around Commissioner Gordon’s early days policing the city, with some appearances from young Bruce Wayne and a variety of origin stories for some familiar villains. This new venture will be directly tied to the movie universe, much like Marvel’s forthcoming collection of shows for Disney+. No word yet on whether Pattinson, Reeves’ Batman, or Jeffrey Wright, who plays Gordon in the movie, will appear, but that may depend on the success of the project, which is yet to be seen.

But one thing’s for sure: people can’t get enough of Batman and his universe, so building content around the popular superhero and his associated lore isn’t a terrible idea.